Validity evidence for an instrument for cognitive load for virtual didactic sessions

Background: COVID necessitated the shift to virtual resident instruction. The challenge of learning via virtual modalities has the potential to increase cognitive load. It is important for educators to reduce cognitive load to optimize learning, yet there are few available tools to measure cognitive load. The objective of this study is to identify and provide validity evidence following Messicks’ framework for an instrument to evaluate cognitive load in virtual emergency medicine didactic sessions.
Methods: This study followed Messicks’ framework for validity including content, response process, internal structure, and relationship to other variables. Content validity evidence included: (1) engagement of reference librarian and literature review of existing instruments; (2) engagement of experts in cognitive load, and relevant stakeholders to review the literature and choose an instrument appropriate to measure cognitive load in EM didactic presentations. Response process validity was gathered using the format and anchors of instruments with previous validity evidence and piloting amongst the author group. A lecture was provided by one faculty to four residency programs via ZoomTM. Afterwards, residents completed the cognitive load instrument. Descriptive statistics were collected; Cronbach’s alpha assessed internal consistency of the instrument; and correlation for relationship to other variables (quality of lecture).
Results: The 10-item Leppink Cognitive Load instrument was selected with attention to content and response process validity evidence. Internal structure of the instrument was good (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.80). Subscales performed well-intrinsic load (α = 0.96, excellent), extrinsic load (α = 0.89, good), and germane load (α = 0.97, excellent). Five of the items were correlated with overall quality of lecture (< 0.05).
Conclusions: The 10-item Cognitive Load instrument demonstrated good validity evidence to measure cognitive load and the subdomains of intrinsic, extraneous, and germane load. This instrument can be https://biodas.org/ used to provide feedback to presenters to improve the cognitive load of their presentations.

Assessment of the influence of gluten quality on highland barley dough sheet quality by different instruments

  • This study was to compare the results of texture analyzer with those of farinograph and extensograph and determine whether texture analyzer could be used to evaluate the processing quality of highland barley flour (HBF) dough sheet. The farinograph and extensograph tests were used to determine the reconstituted flour properties, a texture analyzer was applied to measure the tensile strength of HBF dough sheet, and the content of glutenin macropolymer (GMP), free sulfhydryl (-SH) and secondary structure of protein and microstructure in HBF dough sheet were investigated. Furthermore, correlations between these parameters were determined by regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient.
  • It was suggested that the reconstituted flours with a higher gluten index showed a higher farinograph quality number (FQN) and greater maximum resistance to extension (Rm ). HBF dough sheets with higher gluten index possessed higher GMP and lower free -SH contents, a more ordered secondary structure of protein, resulting in a more compact gluten network and a stronger tensile strength (TS).
  • The regression and correlation analysis showed that TS was positively correlated with FQN and Rm . In addition, it was significantly correlated with the content of GMP, -SH, secondary structure of protein and gluten network. It was concluded that texture analyzer could be an alternative approach to evaluate the processing quality of HBF dough sheet. Moreover, the gluten index of flours could be used to predict the processing quality of HBF dough sheet. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Development of an Instrument to Assess the Stability of Cementless Femoral Implants Using Vibration Analysis During Total Hip Arthroplasty

Objective: The level of primary implant fixation in cementless total hip arthroplasty is a key factor for the longevity of the implant. Vibration-based methods show promise for providing quantitative information to help surgeons monitor implant fixation intraoperatively. A thorough understanding of what is driving these changes in vibrational behavior is important for further development and improvement of these methods. Additionally, an instrument must be designed to enable surgeons to leverage these methods. This study addresses both of these issues.
Method: An augmented system approach was used to develop an instrument that improves the sensitivity of the vibrational method and enables the implementation of the necessary excitation and measurement equipment. The augmented system approach took into account the dynamics of the existing bone-implant system and its interaction with the added instrument.
Results: Two instrument designs are proposed, accompanied by a convergence-based method to determine the insertion endpoint. The modal strain energy density distribution was shown to affect the vibrational sensitivity to contact changes in certain areas.
Conclusion: The augmented system approach led to an instrument design that improved the sensitivity to changes in the proximal region of the combined bone-implant-instrument system. This fact was confirmed both in silico and in vitro. Clinical Impact: The presented method and instruments address practical intraoperative challenges and provide perspective to objectively support the surgeon’s decision-making process, which will ensure optimal patient treatment.

Validation of the PAM-13 instrument in the Hungarian general population 40 years old and above

Background: Patient activation comprises the skills, knowledge and motivation necessary for patients’ effective contribution to their care. We adapted and validated the 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13) in the ≥ 40 years old Hungarian general population.
Methods: A cross-sectional web survey was conducted among 900 respondents selected from an online panel via quota sampling. After 10 days, the survey was repeated on 100 respondents. The distribution, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, factor structure, convergent, discriminant and known-groups validity of PAM-13 were assessed according to the COSMIN guidelines.
Results: The sample comprised 779 respondents. Mean (± SD) age was 60.4 ± 10.6 years, 54% were female and 67% had chronic illness. Mean (± SD) PAM-13 score was 60.6 ± 10.0. We found good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha: 0.77), moderate test-retest reliability (ICC: 0.62; n = 75), a single-factor structure and good content validity: PAM-13 showed moderate correlation with the eHealth Literacy Scale (r = 0.40), and no correlation with age (r = 0.02), education (r = 0.04) or income (ρ = 0.04). Higher PAM-13 scores were associated with fewer lifestyle risks (p < 0.001), more frequent health information seeking (p < 0.001), participation in patient education (p = 0.018) and various online health-related behaviours. When controlling for health literacy, sociodemographic factors and health status, the association of higher PAM-13 scores with overall fewer lifestyle risks, normal body mass index, physical activity and adequate diet remained significant. Similar properties were observed in the subgroup of participants with chronic morbidity, but not in the age group 65+.
Conclusion: PAM-13 demonstrated good validity in the general population. Its properties in clinical populations and the elderly as well as responsiveness to interventions warrant further research.

Accuris

E3000-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 845.75 EUR

Accuris

W1000-100 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 102.7 EUR

Accuris

W1000-1000 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 186.08 EUR

Accuris

W1000-200 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 110.68 EUR

Accuris

W1000-500 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 125.9 EUR

Accuris

W1005-100 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 80.23 EUR

Accuris

W1005-1000 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 121.55 EUR

Accuris

W1005-200 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 85.3 EUR

Accuris

W1005-2000 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 159.25 EUR

Accuris

W1100-200 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 343.4 EUR

Accuris

W1101-6-100 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 404.3 EUR

Accuris

W1105-20 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 76.6 EUR

Accuris

W1105-500 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 99.08 EUR

Accuris

W1105-9-1000 Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 186.08 EUR

Accuris

W3100-120-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 1513.55 EUR

Accuris

W3100-210-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 1748.45 EUR

Accuris

W3100A-120-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 1604.03 EUR

Accuris

W3100A-210-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 1852.85 EUR

Accuris

W3200-120-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 852.35 EUR

Accuris

W3200-1200-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 852.35 EUR

Accuris

W3200-320-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 904.55 EUR

Accuris

W3200-3200-E Benchmark Scientific 1 PC 904.55 EUR

Leave a Comment